Fun and Interactive Museums For The Family

A place, whether locally or internationally, definitely has its own culture that sets it apart from others. It can even be considered an identity not just for the area, but for its residents and citizens as well.

As one travels to a city, town or country, new learnings and experiences can be brought and shared to the people back home. Or if with company, such can be relived and reminisced from time to time.

Of course, when talking of civilisation, refinement and the richness of way of life, the United Kingdom is definitely not one to back down. With its proud streamline of landmarks and tourist spots, it is without question why a massive number flock to the mainland.

Now, vacationing with the family is most likely and supposing parents want to bring the kids to not just play around but also learn a thing or two, it is a recommendation to visit museums and hop from one to another.

But since the little ones will probably think such activities are boring, why not bring them to fun and interactive depositories that they would love to stay in for long hours, even the whole day?

1. V & A Museum of Childhood

This one situated at the Cambridge Heath Road is actually a branch of the Victoria and Albert Museum (hence the V & A in its name). There are a lot of activities for everyone with ages 3 to 12 years old. Sensory and interactive storytelling sessions and arts and crafts sessions are up for the taking. Until September 6, 2015 will be the Small Stories exhibition. It will take you through the history and stories of famous doll houses. China dolls and teddy bears are parts of their wide collection.

2. National Football Museum
When hearing of Manchester, of course, what comes to mind would be the phenomenal sport and pastime, football. Now, there is a designated spot to find all things related to the activity and this is the National Football Museum. It houses the world’s greatest from the FIFA collection, the Football League collection and the Football Association collection, among others. Trophies and jerseys, whether past or present, are exhibited for the interest of both the young and the old. Boys will more so love the visit for sure.

3. Big Pit National Coal Museum
This is a heritage site that was actually a coal mine in business from the year 1860 to the year 1980. Going to the Big Pit National Coal Museum is a wondrous and interesting tour as visitors get to go underground where the mining has been done and performed. Helmets and cap lamps will be worn and along with a tour guide, one will get to walk through and pick up a thing or two about the happenings of the past.

4. Coventry Transport Museum

Known beforehand as the Museum of British Road Transport, as its name suggests, this museum contains British made vehicles, from cars, motorcycles and bicycles. An array of old and new models grace their grounds.

5. Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum
Glasgow, Scotland is proud to present one of the most visited museums in the United Kingdom (aside from London that is). Everywhere, there are fine art, paintings and sculptures to look into and gain knowledge about. In it, there are 22 galleries and more than 8,000 objects – for sure both the parents and the children will be very much enriched. European artworks were put out for display again in 2006 after its three years of restoration. The one responsible for such is no other than Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II.

Tourist families will certainly delight going in and out and transferring from one of these museums to another. And what is extremely important to be noted is that all listed here are for free! Yes, admission is free – there is no need to pay for an entrance fee. That just means all are welcome to have fun and entertain themselves.

Such arrangement would be good to interact and socialise with others as well. Meet people from other walks of life. Converse with fellow mothers and fathers. Allow the kids to play around with others, though parental supervision must still be practiced to avoid any loss of sorts.

Take these points and add them in to a vacation itinerary with loved ones. Make the most of time as folks get together and educate themselves of a new and rich culture that is of the United Kingdom. It will no doubt be an unforgettable experience for all.

10 of the best English gardens to visit (with pictures)

Relaxation with nature can bring much benefits to children and adults alike. With the vibrant colours and fragrant smells of both plants and flowers, for sure anyone who is out to breathe some fresh air and distress will achieve it.

Now, England and the United Kingdom in general, pride themselves on their big and beautiful gardens and locals and tourists can just visit them at any time! The people behind the gardens are definitely outstanding. Anyhow, here are 10 of them:

1. Sissinghurst Castle
This attraction is in Biddenden Road, Kent and this wondrous place was worked on in the 1930s by Vita Sackville-West, the poet and writer, and Harold Nicolson, her diplomat and author husband. Its vast history includes being a prison, a home for the women’s army and a family home. Enjoy taking in the architectural ruins of the 450 acre wide estate.

2. Rousham House
Rousham is the work of William Kent. The house that was built in 1635 by Sir Robert Dormer is still standing there. It is at the North of Oxford. Weddings and other events can be held in the area.

3. Hidcote
Made by American horticulturist, Major Lawrence Johnston, this garden in the north Cotswolds is full of natural goodness. The variety of healthy and colourful plants can surely engage people to go into gardening.

4. The Eden Project
This famous attraction is more than just about their stunning garden design and landscape. Social and environmental projects are also its focus. In any case, it is home to the world’s largest rainforest with a canopy walkway where you can walk among the treetops.

5. Alnwick Garden
The contemporary garden is a joint creation of great garden designers from Belgium, Jacques and Peter Wirtz and the Duchess of Northumberland herself. It is next to the Alnwick Castle, a location for the Harry Potter films.

6. The Royal Botanic Gardens Kew
Explore the world’s most famous botanic garden. This historic 300 acre space has over 100 attractions such as buildings and glasshouses.

7. The National Arboretum
It prides itself on its extensive tree collection and its special Enchanted Christmas event. This location is perfect for some nature tripping.

8. Stourhead
It first opened in 1740s and was named as a living work of art. It houses the Palladian mansion and a landscape garden. A famous scene in the film Pride and Prejudice was also shot there.

9. Castle Howard
The place offers nature with its many annual events like Christmas Fairs and Monumental Tours. This Yorkshire garden was the Historic Houses Association/Christie’s Garden of the Year in 2011.

10. Hampton Court Palace
The Great Vine and The Privy Garden – these are just two of the things found in the Hampton Court. Get to take the sight of blooming flower life as well.

Hire landscape gardeners in Leeds to achieve a garden like these. The beauty of these landscapes can be brought to both simple and grand homes. Take advantage of such chance to take delight and benefit nature.

King Richard III: The Hunchback King


For centuries historians have actually discussed Richard III and whether his credibility as a ruthless hunchback master was an important representation of his reign or merely a figment of Shakespeare’s creativity.
Now it would seem that a minimum of several of that legend may be true, after archaeologists uncovered a completely undamaged skeletal system that they think is that of the medieval king which, crucially, has a warped spinal column.
The remains were discovered 3 weeks into an archaeological dig by a group from Leicester University, which lately identified the website of Grey Friars church, where Richard was believed to be stashed after being eliminated in the Battle of Bosworth in August 1485.
Little has actually been found out about Richard III’s end, aside from he died on the combat zone and was supposedly taken on horseback by his vanquisher, Henry Tudor, who later on ended up being King Henry VII.
The only well-known account of Richard’s fatality is in a poem which mentions he was “poleaxed to the head”.
He was the last of the Plantagenet dynasty and his death was definitive in the Wars of the Roses. Richard’s two-year power was the subject of among William Shakespeare’s many famous plays, which depicted him as a bad, hideous hunchback, and which assisted glue everyone understanding of him.
Little has actually been learnt about Richard III’s end, aside from he passed away on the battlefield and was supposedly handled horseback by his vanquisher, Henry Tudor, which later ended up being King Henry VII.
The only known account of Richard’s fatality is in a rhyme which mentions he was “poleaxed to the head”.
He was the last of the Plantagenet dynasty and his fatality was decisive in the Wars of the Roses. Richard’s 2– year power was the subject of among William Shakespeare’s many celebrated plays, which portrayed him as a bad, ugly hunchback, and which helped glue everyone understanding of him.
Little has been learnt about Richard III’s end, apart from he perished on the battlefield and was supposedly handled horseback by his vanquisher, Henry Tudor, which later ended up being King Henry VII.
The only well-known account of Richard’s fatality is in a rhyme which mentions he was “poleaxed to the head”.
He was the last of the Plantagenet dynasty and his fatality was decisive in the Wars of the Roses. Richard’s two– year reign was the topic of one of William Shakespeare’s most popular plays, which represented him as an evil, awful hunchback, and which helped cement everyone perception of him.
DNA Test has confirmed that the remains found were that of King Richard III.

Iron Age and Roman coins found together in Derbyshire cave

 A precious stockpile of Roman and Late Iron Age coins has been uncovered in a cave where it has actually existed uninterrupted for more than 2,000 years, BBC reported. The treasure trove was unearthed after a member of the general public come across 4 coins in the cavern in Dovedale in Derbyshire’s Peak District.
The discovery triggered a full-blown excavation of the site. Experts claim it is the initial time coins from these 2 different civilisations have been discovered hidden with each other.

Excavators found 26 coins, including 3 Roman coins which pre-date the intrusion of Britain in AD43, and 20 various other gold and silver pieces which are Late Iron Age and believed to belong to the Corieltavi people. Roman coins have actually often been located in areas, this is recognized to be the initial time they have actually been unearthed in a cave. The cache has been proclaimed as “treasure”.

National Trust excavator Rachael Hall said: “The coins would certainly suggest a serious amount of wide range and power of the individual which had them.
“Coins were used a lot more as a symbol of power and condition during the Late Iron Age, as opposed to for trading staple foods and products.
“Was a specific individual merely hiding his ‘best things’ for safekeeping? Or maybe hypothesizing, in the hope that the value would certainly increase in the future, like a modern-day ISA?”.
She stated the circumstance of the cave could possibly not be overlooked.